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The National Post: Dear Author

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“What I didn’t acknowledge is that the act of writing about trauma, about our secrets, about our shame, may indeed be brave, but it is important to give ourselves permission to be weak. In a new age of constant online vitriol, we are instructed to steel ourselves against the world, to be impervious to harm and to never reveal ourselves to be affected, yet truly powerful non-fiction writing is about vulnerability before it is about anything else.”

Read the full essay in The Afterword.

“Among Infidelity’s pleasures is how much Fowles conveys through uncomplicated language, revealing herself to be a skilled and confident author. . . Above all, it’s an intelligent demonstration of why broken, destructive relationships must be repaired or abandoned, and the difficulty of pursuing either course.” —Patricia Maunder, Quill & Quire

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Storybook Confidential

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Monday, September 16, 2013 - 7:30pm

Gladstone Hotel, 1214 Queen Street West, Toronto, ON
Toronto’s vibrant book, art and indie rock worlds will come together at Storybook Confidential, a night for grownups in support of Small Print Toronto’s interactive literary programs for children.

Local literary luminaries – including Kyle Buckley, Claire Caldwell, Stacey May Fowles, James Grainger, Evan Munday,  Grace O’Connell, Damian Rogers, Kevin Sylvester, Ania Szabo, Natalie Zina Walschots, Jessica Westhead, Nathan Whitlock and Liz Worth –  will read stories they wrote when they were young.

Top artists, illustrators and picture book creators – including Clayton Hanmer (CTON), Walker Ballantyne-Hill, Matt James, Hilary Leung, Frank Viva, Chris Wilkie, and Cybèle Young – will offer temporary tattoos at a Body Art booth.

Such stellar scribes as Steven Beattie, Hamutal Dotan and Kate Minsky  will take turns producing short illustrated tales based on suggestions from the audience at a “Make Me A Storybook” booth.

Leading lights of the Toronto indie music scene Don Kerr, Kevin Lacroix and Bellwoods Trinity will perform original tunes. And DJ Peter Martin will spin retro 80s and 90s dance hits.

And prepare to be dazzled. Celebrated craft artist Kalpna Patel, perhaps most widely known for her eye-poppingly inventive windows at TYPE Books on Queen St West, will design and dress the Gladstone Ballroom.

Don’t miss the first-ever Small Print Toronto extravaganza where parents are encouraged to leave their kids at home!

They Arrived in the Fall

The National Post asked a group of Canadian writers, who all have new books out later this year, to team up on a short story. All they provided was an opening sentence: “They arrived in the fall …”

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Watching Like a Girl

“If the Blue Jays organization is in any way invested in cultivating and profiting from a new female audience, it would be wise to manage how women are marketed to, and to consider its part in the way we are treated by mainstream sports media. I mean, why would you ever want to support, with your dollars or your love, a franchise that doesn’t respect your knowledge, interest or passion for it? That assumes you are stupid, but hopes you are pretty?”

-Watching Like a Girl, over at The Walrus

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Recent Reviews

A review of Michelle Orange’s This is Running for Your Life in Quill and Quire.

the game is an organic beast, constantly moving and changing in a way that is impossible to pin down. The length of the season – the forgiving (but also punishing) number of games – means hope is almost always alive. But the constant reversals of fortune also result in debilitating challenges for a writer charged with weaving a coherent narrative thread. - See more at: http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8055#sthash.66mM7WG0.dpuf

the game is an organic beast, constantly moving and changing in a way that is impossible to pin down. The length of the season – the forgiving (but also punishing) number of games – means hope is almost always alive. But the constant reversals of fortune also result in debilitating challenges for a writer charged with weaving a coherent narrative thread. - See more at: http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8055#sthash.66mM7WG0.dpuf
the game is an organic beast, constantly moving and changing in a way that is impossible to pin down. The length of the season – the forgiving (but also punishing) number of games – means hope is almost always alive. But the constant reversals of fortune also result in debilitating challenges for a writer charged with weaving a coherent narrative thread. - See more at: http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8055#sthash.66mM7WG0.dpuf
the game is an organic beast, constantly moving and changing in a way that is impossible to pin down. The length of the season – the forgiving (but also punishing) number of games – means hope is almost always alive. But the constant reversals of fortune also result in debilitating challenges for a writer charged with weaving a coherent narrative thread. - See more at: http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/review.cfm?review_id=8055#sthash.66mM7WG0.dpuf

A review of Jeff Blair’s Full Count in Quill and Quire.

October 2013

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